In English

In English

Five departments installed at LUX

“Of course there’s a bit of apprehension, just like when two people move in together. This is five families who have moved into the same building. We don’t know each other and our daily routines yet. We’ll have to find out as we go along”, said Therese Whass, a student at the Centre for Theology and Religious Studies about how it feels to move into LUX.

In English

Life goes on – but the scars remain

Just over ten years after Goran Basic came to Sweden as a refugee from the former Yugoslavia, he travelled back to his ethnically cleansed village. As a researcher in sociology, he wanted to try and carry out a non-judgemental study and interview survivors about forgiveness, reconciliation and the role of victim. One thesis and ten years later, he has now published his research articles.
“Previously, it was difficult for me to put into words what had happened, but thanks to the research, I found the analytical concepts I needed to talk about what happened during the war and afterwards.”

In English

Finding new inspiration in Berlin…

“My stay here has not only given me practical access to sources and libraries. Being in a different academic environment has also given me new ideas and perspectives on what we do in Lund.”
These are the words of historian Marie Cronqvist, who moved to Berlin with her husband and children last summer. Now it will soon be time to go home, but before that LUM had time to meet them and find out about their new experiences.

In English

Social anthropologist who lived with perpetrators of genocide

The Hutu militia FDLR, who were behind the genocide in Rwanda, now live in eastern Congo, one of a number of rebel groups in the war-torn country. Social anthropologist Anna Hedlund has lived with the group and describes the systematic attacks on the Congolese population, as well as a hopeless situation in which the group live as exiles, not welcome anywhere.

In English

“There are a lot of duties in this role”,

Being director of the International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics is about choosing what to do, and what not to do. At the start, Lena Neij travelled a lot, but now she sees representing the institute abroad as a responsibility shared by all the staff. She still supervises doctoral students, but doesn’t have the time she would like for her own research, nor for students and teaching.
“There are a lot of duties in this role”, she says.

In English

Tape could simplify skin cancer diagnosis

The bad news about malignant melanoma is that the disease is increasing more rapidly than most other types of cancer. The good news is that it is easy to cure, as long as it is detected in time. A research group in Lund has therefore started a project that it is hoped will make it easier to correctly diagnose suspicious moles.

In English

Polar bear a hackneyed image of climate change

How can images show that the world we live in is being subjected to ongoing climate change? This is the research question being considered by Adam Brenthel, a doctoral student in art history. He has studied researchers’ attempts to translate their findings into images to better communicate them to the general public. He thinks polar bears, the animal most often used to symbolise climate change, are inadequate.

In English

University must concentrate focus on strong areas of research

The eminent London universities UCL and Imperial College, as well as the University Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris and Chalmers in Sweden, have all concentrated their focus on areas of research excellence and global challenges. Lund University should draw inspiration from their example, in the view of Pro Vice-Chancellor for research Sven Strömqvist.

In English

Staff training to boost e-learning

What should the University do to be at the forefront in e-learning? A new inquiry shows that better collaboration between digital platforms and training of lecturers on how digital teaching can be used to improve students’ learning are a step in the right direction.

In English

Fewer Malmö city-dwellers take a break on Stortorget

Stortorget, the main square in the centre of Malmö, has looked the same for the past 35 years or so but the way in which the city’s inhabitants use the space has changed. These changes provide a picture of the development of the city and community, from an industrial society to a society based on services and consumption.