In English

In English

Syria is waiting for ”enough is enough”…

Meet Jean-Pierre Filiu, Professor in Middle East Studies at Sciences Po., who visited Lund last week during the conference “Everyday Life in the Middle East”, hosted by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University.
He is a former diplomat with long experience from the Middle East. This summer he visited Syria to see how the revolution affected people’s everyday life. We asked him about his impressions from Syria and what he thinks about US and Russia’s peace-making efforts.

In English

Swedish elderly research exported to Latvia

Entry phones can cause problems. For elderly people with a visual impairment or reduced mobility, getting into one’s flat can suddenly become a challenge. However, researchers can also experience problems. One person who knows is occupational therapist Elina Taurina, who has mapped environmental obstacles for elderly people in Latvia together with researchers from Lund University.
“A number of times I had to stand and wait outside the door until someone came along who could let me in”, said Elina Taurina at a conference in Riga at the start of the summer.

In English

Lund to coordinate new EU exchange with India

For the next four years, Lund University will coordinate a new exchange programme with India. Over 100 Indian scholarship recipients will get the chance to study or do research in Europe. Lund University hopes that many of them will choose Lund as their destination.
“We are pleased that the European Commission has put its trust in us again. We can now further develop the relationships we have built with Indian universities in previous exchange programmes”, says coordinator Pär Svensson, External Relations at Lund University.

In English

Lund welcomes students from around the world

Lund University is welcoming this autumn’s new international students. Around 2 000 students from around the world will be arriving in Lund to study for a semester or longer.

In English

New paths to treatment of epilepsy

Using harmless viruses to insert genes that produce healthy, healing substances into the brain… transplanting cells, possibly from the patient’s own skin… or, most sci-fi of all, controlling special treated nerve cells with light signals in the brain.
These are three different paths to a possible treatment for epilepsy that are being tested by a research group in Lund. To help them, the researchers have living cells from patients who have undergone a brain operation.

In English

The mobile that will save children’s lives in Malawi

Infant mortality in Malawi is among the highest in the world. In a new EU-funded project, researchers from Lund, Cork and Oxford will develop new mobile technology to help health care staff in the country diagnose and treat serious diseases earlier and more effectively.

In English

Gigantic database stores information about democracy worldwide

All over the world, thousands of experts are sitting entering information about their home countries into a huge democracy database. Soon, three quarters of the world’s countries will have been entered.
“In my megalomaniac moments, I usually compare the database to the CERN particle accelerator. It will be as important a tool for political scientists as CERN is for physicists”, says Jan Teorell, who is one of those leading the work.

In English

Monster waves a mathematical challenge

For a mathematician, the waves of the sea are related to differential equations, and particularly complex ones at that. Mathematical research can help to improve understanding of how waves form and move – which could be useful, for example, in the work to predict dangerous monster waves.

In English

Research facilitators…

Two full-time technicians help biology researchers to realise new ingenious ways of gathering data on how animals move. Thanks to computer chips, wireless communication and nanotechnology, the researchers can achieve groundbreaking results.